Tag: surgery

20190816_liver_cover-crop

Researchers Develop “Supercool” Organ Preservation Technique to Give Clinicians and Recipients More Time for Transplants

For the first time, researchers successfully “supercooled” a human liver and returned it back to normal body temperatures without any ice injury. Using this supercooling preservation method, the research team, led by Reinier de Vries, MD, were able to triple the shelf-life of human livers from about nine hours to 27 hours.

Continue Reading
072718ResQFoam

ResQFoam Study Seeks Feedback on Clinical Trial for Trauma Patients

The REVIVE clinical trial team is seeking feedback from the public on their study testing the use of RESQFOAM in severely injured trauma patients.

Continue Reading

Brown Seeks to Change The Way We Think About Anesthesia

Emery Brown, MD, PhD, and a team of collaborating investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital are hoping to make a fundamental change in the way anesthesiologists think about the process of sedation—one that changes the focus from the body to the brain. Image ©sergey7777 / 123RF Stock Photo LEARN MORE

Continue Reading

The Ether Dome, the Operating Room That Changed Medical History

Check out this great video showcasing the Ether Dome at Massachusetts General Hospital, home to the first public demonstration of surgery using ether as an anesthetic in 1846. The Ether Dome has played a central role in our hospital’s storied past, and still serves as a center for sharing innovative new medical ideas today.  

Continue Reading

Study Suggests Positive Gains From Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

Patients with all classes of obesity, including, mild, moderate, and severe, with all stages of fibrosis, experienced gains in life years following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, compared with standard management and intensive lifestyle changes, based on the model, Dr. Kathleen Corey reported at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver […]

Continue Reading

Anesthesia: Who Knew What When?

“On October 16, 1846, at Massachusetts General Hospital, [William T.G. Morton] successfully administered ether to a surgical patient in a public demonstration. As acclaim was heaped upon Morton, [Horace] Wells unsurprisingly cried foul—but so did [Charles T.] Jackson. A bitter dispute rose all the way to Congress…” READ MORE

Continue Reading